Stories

 “I’m intelligent, determined, and consistent. I could give you thirty more but I’ll stick with the three. I’m determined because of where I grew up at. I grew up in the West End and everybody thinks that it’s so bad but as long as you mind your business, you don’t have too much to worry about. I had to consistently strive to better for myself. I wanna become better, as far as being a better role model for the next generation coming up.  For the most part, we do good things. We tend to strive for better things for ourselves and we try to be everybody’s cheerleader. I like to give the kids in the community what I didn’t have when I was growing up. For the most part, everything is kosher.  The happiest moment of my life is when I realized that my mom was my mama. I was about five or six. I knew she was my mom but I didn’t know she was my mama. She has the voice of an angel. When she spoke, everybody listened. Everybody would stop everything because she had the voice of power. She was very knowledgable about what went on in the world. She passed when I was seventeen. It’s been a long time, about nine years. I miss her to this day and I try to keep her legacy moving forward. She keeps me going because I know she’s looking down and watching me.   Be genuine and care for others. Help other people out. You never know what a person is going through. Be careful with how you speak to people. Be kind and treat people how you want to be treated. It’s the greatest thing in the world, to have a friend in every aspect of life.” - Datonio, Park Hill 

“I’m intelligent, determined, and consistent. I could give you thirty more but I’ll stick with the three. I’m determined because of where I grew up at. I grew up in the West End and everybody thinks that it’s so bad but as long as you mind your business, you don’t have too much to worry about. I had to consistently strive to better for myself. I wanna become better, as far as being a better role model for the next generation coming up.

For the most part, we do good things. We tend to strive for better things for ourselves and we try to be everybody’s cheerleader. I like to give the kids in the community what I didn’t have when I was growing up. For the most part, everything is kosher.

The happiest moment of my life is when I realized that my mom was my mama. I was about five or six. I knew she was my mom but I didn’t know she was my mama. She has the voice of an angel. When she spoke, everybody listened. Everybody would stop everything because she had the voice of power. She was very knowledgable about what went on in the world. She passed when I was seventeen. It’s been a long time, about nine years. I miss her to this day and I try to keep her legacy moving forward. She keeps me going because I know she’s looking down and watching me. 

Be genuine and care for others. Help other people out. You never know what a person is going through. Be careful with how you speak to people. Be kind and treat people how you want to be treated. It’s the greatest thing in the world, to have a friend in every aspect of life.” - Datonio, Park Hill 

 “I used to play semi-pro football. I was working out and there was this kid that would always follow me around, so I ended up working out with him. It gave me the clue that I think that I should coach. I took him to team that I started coaching. I wasn’t the head coach but a position coach. So, they let me on the team to coach as the position. Year after year, I went to different teams, so I could learn from different coaches. I wanted to be a head coach. I was on four different teams. In my mind, I’m learning from different coaches, to help me be a better coach. On everyone else’s mind, I was just jumping from team to team and winning championships. I wasn’t championship hopping but just wanted to learn. Now, I’m a head coach and I wanna put all of that together.  I learned about how to discipline the kids. I was never really big on discipline, so I didn’t think that it would matter. I was thinking that it needed to start at home and it does but I needed to do it here, too. Without that discipline, they won’t listen. I also learned the skills and drills of the modern stuff. Some teams do new stuff and some stick with the old. I do a mixture of both because I experienced both.  I try to keep it all together. I even try to keep up with the kids outside of football. Like on Fridays, when we don’t nothing to do, we all get together and go watch another football game. Sometimes, we’ll get together and get a hotel and they just have fun and vibe together and become a team. Defense is pulling together but offense still needs work.  I played for the Jets. My last year with the them, I got MVP. I used to walk to practice everyday. Even if there was bad stuff going on, I would still walk to practice with all of my equipment. People would always tell me that I needed to coach for the team that I played for. I had coached four teams and the Jets called me and asked me if I wanted to be the head coach and that was perfect.  When I went semi-pro, football wasn’t fun anymore but when I came back here, I found the fun back in football. As you get older, you have to stop playing football but you don’t have to leave the game. You gotta teach the game and that’s fun.  Our challenges are that we don’t have any bleachers. Sometimes parents will sit in their car because we don’t have the seating. I go to other parks and they got bleachers. It will help us have more parent support. I go another team’s game and they have the best parent support. These kids need support. Some parents will just drop their kid off and leave. We need all parents to support because that’s what keeps these kids going.  It’s important to me to be a role model in this community. People don’t understand why I do it. I wanna keep them off the streets. They could be out here doing anything but they’re out here doing something positive. I turned out good by coming to football practice everyday. When I’m with them, it makes me think about how I’m going to be with my son when he gets of age. My son is one. I have a little bitty Camaro and I pack as many kids in it, just to make sure they get to practice because some of them don’t have a way to get here. We should be a championship contender. Remember what I said. The California Jets will be a championship contender. The program is now looking like it did when I played.  Catch us playing at Southern High School for our home games!” - Coach Tone (back row, center) pictured with the California Jets team & coaches in California 

“I used to play semi-pro football. I was working out and there was this kid that would always follow me around, so I ended up working out with him. It gave me the clue that I think that I should coach. I took him to team that I started coaching. I wasn’t the head coach but a position coach. So, they let me on the team to coach as the position. Year after year, I went to different teams, so I could learn from different coaches. I wanted to be a head coach. I was on four different teams. In my mind, I’m learning from different coaches, to help me be a better coach. On everyone else’s mind, I was just jumping from team to team and winning championships. I wasn’t championship hopping but just wanted to learn. Now, I’m a head coach and I wanna put all of that together.

I learned about how to discipline the kids. I was never really big on discipline, so I didn’t think that it would matter. I was thinking that it needed to start at home and it does but I needed to do it here, too. Without that discipline, they won’t listen. I also learned the skills and drills of the modern stuff. Some teams do new stuff and some stick with the old. I do a mixture of both because I experienced both.

I try to keep it all together. I even try to keep up with the kids outside of football. Like on Fridays, when we don’t nothing to do, we all get together and go watch another football game. Sometimes, we’ll get together and get a hotel and they just have fun and vibe together and become a team. Defense is pulling together but offense still needs work.

I played for the Jets. My last year with the them, I got MVP. I used to walk to practice everyday. Even if there was bad stuff going on, I would still walk to practice with all of my equipment. People would always tell me that I needed to coach for the team that I played for. I had coached four teams and the Jets called me and asked me if I wanted to be the head coach and that was perfect.

When I went semi-pro, football wasn’t fun anymore but when I came back here, I found the fun back in football. As you get older, you have to stop playing football but you don’t have to leave the game. You gotta teach the game and that’s fun.

Our challenges are that we don’t have any bleachers. Sometimes parents will sit in their car because we don’t have the seating. I go to other parks and they got bleachers. It will help us have more parent support. I go another team’s game and they have the best parent support. These kids need support. Some parents will just drop their kid off and leave. We need all parents to support because that’s what keeps these kids going.

It’s important to me to be a role model in this community. People don’t understand why I do it. I wanna keep them off the streets. They could be out here doing anything but they’re out here doing something positive. I turned out good by coming to football practice everyday. When I’m with them, it makes me think about how I’m going to be with my son when he gets of age. My son is one. I have a little bitty Camaro and I pack as many kids in it, just to make sure they get to practice because some of them don’t have a way to get here. We should be a championship contender. Remember what I said. The California Jets will be a championship contender. The program is now looking like it did when I played.

Catch us playing at Southern High School for our home games!” - Coach Tone (back row, center) pictured with the California Jets team & coaches in California 

 “I started off on 36th & Broadway, for about six years. Then I did about five or six years in Portland, on 28th. I just moved over here to 20 & Chestnut, so I’m making my way east. A lot of people have a misconception of what the West End is really about. It’s not as violent and as crazy as people seem to make it. It’s actually a pretty close community. Sure, crime happens, just as anywhere else in the world. Things happens from Prospect to Fern Creek. It’s not that different.  The community sticks up for each other, even if they don’t like each other, especially in Portland. There’s generations upon generations that have never left Portland. There are certain people who will not grocery shop at Kroger. There’s grocery stores in Portland that they will go to, that’s been open for seventy years or more. Curtis Market is one of them. I used to live right down the street from them. It was an awesome place. It’s a very tight community and I like it but it was noisy. You get used to it once you’ve been there long enough.  Speaking of the West End, my children are so friendly because everybody in neighborhood speaks to everybody. I can’t take my little boy for a walk without somebody yelling, “Hey, little boy! Here’s a dollar. Go get yourself some candy!”. My son is 4 years old and he’s always speaking to the guy across the street. I think kids, growing up in this area, experience the tight knit community. It just feels good when people make it a point to stop and speak to people. That’s how we do it here.  I don’t care if I’m rich or poor. I just want to be happy. I want my kids and grandkids to be happy, too. I wanna instill in their brains that happiness is what you make it. You can’t go seeking it, it’s what you make it. To be content with yourself and what you’ve got going on is everything. I learned that for myself. That’s the only thing I can pass on. You can’t do it over, you better live it. There ain’t no do overs.  I want my children and grandchildren to be the best people they can be. The only way they can achieve that is if I’m the best person I can be. I don’t want them to be stuck up but more empathetic and open. People have forgotten how to relate to others. Keep in mind, rich or poor, fat or skinny, black or white, you have to be empathetic towards each other. We’re all human, regardless.” - Stella, Russell

“I started off on 36th & Broadway, for about six years. Then I did about five or six years in Portland, on 28th. I just moved over here to 20 & Chestnut, so I’m making my way east. A lot of people have a misconception of what the West End is really about. It’s not as violent and as crazy as people seem to make it. It’s actually a pretty close community. Sure, crime happens, just as anywhere else in the world. Things happens from Prospect to Fern Creek. It’s not that different.

The community sticks up for each other, even if they don’t like each other, especially in Portland. There’s generations upon generations that have never left Portland. There are certain people who will not grocery shop at Kroger. There’s grocery stores in Portland that they will go to, that’s been open for seventy years or more. Curtis Market is one of them. I used to live right down the street from them. It was an awesome place. It’s a very tight community and I like it but it was noisy. You get used to it once you’ve been there long enough.

Speaking of the West End, my children are so friendly because everybody in neighborhood speaks to everybody. I can’t take my little boy for a walk without somebody yelling, “Hey, little boy! Here’s a dollar. Go get yourself some candy!”. My son is 4 years old and he’s always speaking to the guy across the street. I think kids, growing up in this area, experience the tight knit community. It just feels good when people make it a point to stop and speak to people. That’s how we do it here.

I don’t care if I’m rich or poor. I just want to be happy. I want my kids and grandkids to be happy, too. I wanna instill in their brains that happiness is what you make it. You can’t go seeking it, it’s what you make it. To be content with yourself and what you’ve got going on is everything. I learned that for myself. That’s the only thing I can pass on. You can’t do it over, you better live it. There ain’t no do overs.

I want my children and grandchildren to be the best people they can be. The only way they can achieve that is if I’m the best person I can be. I don’t want them to be stuck up but more empathetic and open. People have forgotten how to relate to others. Keep in mind, rich or poor, fat or skinny, black or white, you have to be empathetic towards each other. We’re all human, regardless.” - Stella, Russell

 “The older generation understands us. The old heads, on the block, used to do the same stuff we’re doing now. They got more of an understanding of what we’re into. They’ve been here before. We just mess around and get caught because we’re in a new age with new technology. They didn’t have that, so they got away with a whole lot of stuff. For real, it’s the same stuff but technology just makes everyone aware of what everyone else is doing. That’s all.” - Taylor Desmond, Tyreuane, Tyquan & Steven in Portland

“The older generation understands us. The old heads, on the block, used to do the same stuff we’re doing now. They got more of an understanding of what we’re into. They’ve been here before. We just mess around and get caught because we’re in a new age with new technology. They didn’t have that, so they got away with a whole lot of stuff. For real, it’s the same stuff but technology just makes everyone aware of what everyone else is doing. That’s all.” - Taylor Desmond, Tyreuane, Tyquan & Steven in Portland

  “I lost my job. Life has been kinda hard. I was just taught to never give up no matter what, so that’s what I gotta do. I got three kids that keep me going and I have to do this for.   I became a father when I was twenty. I had twin boys, then I had my third son. It’s not easy but I have to keep pushing for them. I have to work extra hard to help my babies’ mother. I just want a better future for my kids. I want them to go to school and go to college and make something of themselves. I want them to have goals and to be able to reach them.  My advice to the world? Stay humble, stay woke, and strive to do the best you can possibly do.”- Alijah, California

 “I lost my job. Life has been kinda hard. I was just taught to never give up no matter what, so that’s what I gotta do. I got three kids that keep me going and I have to do this for. 

I became a father when I was twenty. I had twin boys, then I had my third son. It’s not easy but I have to keep pushing for them. I have to work extra hard to help my babies’ mother. I just want a better future for my kids. I want them to go to school and go to college and make something of themselves. I want them to have goals and to be able to reach them.

My advice to the world? Stay humble, stay woke, and strive to do the best you can possibly do.”- Alijah, California

 “I met all of the people that live in this building. It’s awesome that I make some friendships every time I do a piece in this area. I have a few pieces down here. I bounce all around. I’m forty two and have been painting since I was seventeen. This has been my career, without having another job, for about three years. It’s been a twist of fate. I lost my job and I’ve been doing art full-time and it’s been great. It’s definitely a hustle.  Everybody’s different and artists are so weird. We’re just so different. You can’t half ass it. You have to be full force. It’s hard being your own boss. It’s a hell of a lot easier to have some other person tell you what to do for a while and you get to go home with a check rather than having to make it happen for yourself. There’s something to be said when you’re able to paint full-time. I’m fortunate. They don’t tell you about that hard stuff in art school. You have to motivate yourself and connect with people. A lot of what I do is word of mouth.  Be kind to each other. It’s been such a mess. I have three damn kids that have to grow up and deal with this. Just love each other and make art.” - Casey, Russell

“I met all of the people that live in this building. It’s awesome that I make some friendships every time I do a piece in this area. I have a few pieces down here. I bounce all around. I’m forty two and have been painting since I was seventeen. This has been my career, without having another job, for about three years. It’s been a twist of fate. I lost my job and I’ve been doing art full-time and it’s been great. It’s definitely a hustle.

Everybody’s different and artists are so weird. We’re just so different. You can’t half ass it. You have to be full force. It’s hard being your own boss. It’s a hell of a lot easier to have some other person tell you what to do for a while and you get to go home with a check rather than having to make it happen for yourself. There’s something to be said when you’re able to paint full-time. I’m fortunate. They don’t tell you about that hard stuff in art school. You have to motivate yourself and connect with people. A lot of what I do is word of mouth.

Be kind to each other. It’s been such a mess. I have three damn kids that have to grow up and deal with this. Just love each other and make art.” - Casey, Russell

 “I’ve done ten years and been out for two months. That’s all I had was time. I was always interested in chess but I didn’t have the patience. It was too many moves and all that. I had time to study and read. I did a lot of reading. Chess prepares you for a lot of things in life. It prepares you for your next moves. You always gotta think ahead of time and think of your next moves and prepare yourself for life.   It’s a beautiful thing because it will stop you from instant gratification. Me and Monte were out in the streets since we were kids. If we wanted the shoes or cars, we would’ve sold dope and would get it that day. Chess has prepared me for the patience. You won’t look for the instant gratification and you will constantly have your brain working. Today, we lose sight of that.  Black America needs to wake up and it starts with the kids. We gotta get them into things that they can relate to. You can’t keep teaching them about Christopher Columbus and all of these fictitious lies. It’s the truth. Tell them the real! They’re not even interested and they don’t even know what that stuff means. Get them into African Spirituality and tell them about everything we’ve done over there and here. Everything we’ve done was taken away from us and we were forced to take on another culture. It’s the truth.  We need community centers down here. You look at Portland and they still have their Boys & Girls Club and we don’t have anything on this side of Market. We need to get reading centers, too. Reading is essential to life. Our people will parish for the lack of knowledge. We’re failing in a major way. We have to teach our kids about who they are. We gotta know self. You have to know your identity and until you know that, you’re lost.” - Lucky (Right) pictured with Monte, Portland

“I’ve done ten years and been out for two months. That’s all I had was time. I was always interested in chess but I didn’t have the patience. It was too many moves and all that. I had time to study and read. I did a lot of reading. Chess prepares you for a lot of things in life. It prepares you for your next moves. You always gotta think ahead of time and think of your next moves and prepare yourself for life. 

It’s a beautiful thing because it will stop you from instant gratification. Me and Monte were out in the streets since we were kids. If we wanted the shoes or cars, we would’ve sold dope and would get it that day. Chess has prepared me for the patience. You won’t look for the instant gratification and you will constantly have your brain working. Today, we lose sight of that.

Black America needs to wake up and it starts with the kids. We gotta get them into things that they can relate to. You can’t keep teaching them about Christopher Columbus and all of these fictitious lies. It’s the truth. Tell them the real! They’re not even interested and they don’t even know what that stuff means. Get them into African Spirituality and tell them about everything we’ve done over there and here. Everything we’ve done was taken away from us and we were forced to take on another culture. It’s the truth.

We need community centers down here. You look at Portland and they still have their Boys & Girls Club and we don’t have anything on this side of Market. We need to get reading centers, too. Reading is essential to life. Our people will parish for the lack of knowledge. We’re failing in a major way. We have to teach our kids about who they are. We gotta know self. You have to know your identity and until you know that, you’re lost.” - Lucky (Right) pictured with Monte, Portland

 “I live in the Southside but West Louisville, for me, reminds me of my hometown, Radcliff, Kentucky. There’s not too much out here but a grocery store and things like that. It’s the people and the culture. I feel like West Louisville is separated from the rest of the city because of the stigmas and whatnot but I love everything about it. It just reminds me of home. It’s one the few places I feel comfortable at.  Growing up in Radcliff, there’s not a lot of opportunities for kids. I used to play football on a bank property and then would go play basketball on church property. We would always get kicked off those areas. We never had a space where youth could go to, unless you had military privileges and certain benefits. As I got older, I originally looked at things from the lens of basketball. I wanted to give back with the game of basketball. I loved the NBA and wanted to be a pro, but that didn’t work out.  After I started taking classes, I wanted to have a rec center to give back to the kids. I wanted the kids to have the opportunity that I didn’t. So, around my second year of grad school, I realized that I just wanted to work with kids, whether it’d be at the YMCA, Boys & Girls Club, Big Brother Big Sister, or wherever. It turned out that I ended up working in Indiana, at the YMCA, for a couple of years. I learned how to play the game and work with youth and knowing limitations. I then moved back to Kentucky but in Louisville and someone told me about Louisville Urban League. I was like, “There’s an organization for people of color? And I can work with kids?”  Growing up and not having the opportunities, as a kid, I wanted to expose kids to those very opportunities. There’s opportunities out here, but people have to be exposed to them. I also wanted let my people know that they don’t have to do it by themselves and that I’m along for the ride with them. I would much rather put a smile on my face and come to work to help people, whether it’s with chess, character development, college preparation and staying out of trouble than putting on a three piece suit, walking in a bank and making a ton of money and hating my job. For me, it’s all about being happy and doing what I love. I wouldn’t want it any other way.  West Louisville needs each other. The people that live in the community need to start supporting each other. That can be as simple as your kid stepping outside, to play, keep an eye on them. If you see somebody that’s in need, help them out. People in the community just need to support one another. We’re all a unit at the end of the day. If we help support each other, we’ll make it easier for the next generation to come.  Growing up in the projects, if I did something wrong, my mom found out before she would even come home from work. A lot of times, people will just leave it alone, if it’s not their kids. At the end of the day, we’re all just one big family. We all just need to take care of each other in the West.  I don’t think West Louisville makes excuses, but I think that every opportunity for making excuses for West Louisville, needs to stop. Everything that West Louisville needs is right here within our community. Of course, we’re hear them talking about dollars, finances, and organizational support and I get it but we’re all we got, we’re all we need. All you need is your people and everything else will take care of itself. Continue to realize that the solutions are in front of our faces, we just gotta figure it out. With what the world is going through, today, it’s really easy to have a dark and negative attitude. We should look at things in a positive lens, too. Like, yes, we live in a food desert but we also have property that we can live in. There’s a lot of positive things to focus on.  Take advantage of today and worry less about tomorrow. All we have is the now. Let’s say that you’re struggling, today, and you don’t have a dime to your name; that’s just the moment right now. You’re living in the moment, so embrace your struggles because your success will come behind that. Don’t lose sight of what’s in front of your face right now. You can’t get through tomorrow without making it through today. At the same time, realize that today doesn’t define your life. Remember what today is. Now is the time to improve and take advantage of your life, you might not see it two weeks from now. Think about right now because that’s all we got.” - Rodney, Russell

“I live in the Southside but West Louisville, for me, reminds me of my hometown, Radcliff, Kentucky. There’s not too much out here but a grocery store and things like that. It’s the people and the culture. I feel like West Louisville is separated from the rest of the city because of the stigmas and whatnot but I love everything about it. It just reminds me of home. It’s one the few places I feel comfortable at.

Growing up in Radcliff, there’s not a lot of opportunities for kids. I used to play football on a bank property and then would go play basketball on church property. We would always get kicked off those areas. We never had a space where youth could go to, unless you had military privileges and certain benefits. As I got older, I originally looked at things from the lens of basketball. I wanted to give back with the game of basketball. I loved the NBA and wanted to be a pro, but that didn’t work out.

After I started taking classes, I wanted to have a rec center to give back to the kids. I wanted the kids to have the opportunity that I didn’t. So, around my second year of grad school, I realized that I just wanted to work with kids, whether it’d be at the YMCA, Boys & Girls Club, Big Brother Big Sister, or wherever. It turned out that I ended up working in Indiana, at the YMCA, for a couple of years. I learned how to play the game and work with youth and knowing limitations. I then moved back to Kentucky but in Louisville and someone told me about Louisville Urban League. I was like, “There’s an organization for people of color? And I can work with kids?”

Growing up and not having the opportunities, as a kid, I wanted to expose kids to those very opportunities. There’s opportunities out here, but people have to be exposed to them. I also wanted let my people know that they don’t have to do it by themselves and that I’m along for the ride with them. I would much rather put a smile on my face and come to work to help people, whether it’s with chess, character development, college preparation and staying out of trouble than putting on a three piece suit, walking in a bank and making a ton of money and hating my job. For me, it’s all about being happy and doing what I love. I wouldn’t want it any other way.

West Louisville needs each other. The people that live in the community need to start supporting each other. That can be as simple as your kid stepping outside, to play, keep an eye on them. If you see somebody that’s in need, help them out. People in the community just need to support one another. We’re all a unit at the end of the day. If we help support each other, we’ll make it easier for the next generation to come.

Growing up in the projects, if I did something wrong, my mom found out before she would even come home from work. A lot of times, people will just leave it alone, if it’s not their kids. At the end of the day, we’re all just one big family. We all just need to take care of each other in the West.

I don’t think West Louisville makes excuses, but I think that every opportunity for making excuses for West Louisville, needs to stop. Everything that West Louisville needs is right here within our community. Of course, we’re hear them talking about dollars, finances, and organizational support and I get it but we’re all we got, we’re all we need. All you need is your people and everything else will take care of itself. Continue to realize that the solutions are in front of our faces, we just gotta figure it out. With what the world is going through, today, it’s really easy to have a dark and negative attitude. We should look at things in a positive lens, too. Like, yes, we live in a food desert but we also have property that we can live in. There’s a lot of positive things to focus on.

Take advantage of today and worry less about tomorrow. All we have is the now. Let’s say that you’re struggling, today, and you don’t have a dime to your name; that’s just the moment right now. You’re living in the moment, so embrace your struggles because your success will come behind that. Don’t lose sight of what’s in front of your face right now. You can’t get through tomorrow without making it through today. At the same time, realize that today doesn’t define your life. Remember what today is. Now is the time to improve and take advantage of your life, you might not see it two weeks from now. Think about right now because that’s all we got.” - Rodney, Russell

 “There’s a big disconnect between the older and younger generation. The kids in the West End need more guidance from the the older generation. It’s like they were doing the same shit we’re doing. People born in the eighties and nineties look at us and treat us like we’re totally different from them. They always tell us that we’re so different, in a bad way. Where’s the guidance? They just don’t understand us but maybe we’re meant to not be understood by them.” - Shay (far right) pictured with Mike Mike & Keaira in Park DuValle

“There’s a big disconnect between the older and younger generation. The kids in the West End need more guidance from the the older generation. It’s like they were doing the same shit we’re doing. People born in the eighties and nineties look at us and treat us like we’re totally different from them. They always tell us that we’re so different, in a bad way. Where’s the guidance? They just don’t understand us but maybe we’re meant to not be understood by them.” - Shay (far right) pictured with Mike Mike & Keaira in Park DuValle

 “Maintain yourself and try to strive for greatness. Living around here makes it kind of hard for people. It’s hard to get jobs and stuff like that. Keep that mind frame to keep going and do let it stop you.  It’s been so hard for me to find a job. I have help but I want to do things for myself. I have keep reminding myself that I’m going to make it. People are going to know my name, one day. Right now, I just want to get me a job and get into college. I trying to go to college for two years and get my associate’s degree. I want to be an IT Technician. That’s what I want to do. I just want greatness for myself. My time is now, so that’s what I have to be on.  My father’s my biggest influence, man. He just keeps me going and motivated. He’s always keeping that pressure on me and tells me to not stop. He reminds me that this isn’t the end but the beginning. I’m glad to have him around.” D’Montae, pictured with Trey in Shawnee

“Maintain yourself and try to strive for greatness. Living around here makes it kind of hard for people. It’s hard to get jobs and stuff like that. Keep that mind frame to keep going and do let it stop you.

It’s been so hard for me to find a job. I have help but I want to do things for myself. I have keep reminding myself that I’m going to make it. People are going to know my name, one day. Right now, I just want to get me a job and get into college. I trying to go to college for two years and get my associate’s degree. I want to be an IT Technician. That’s what I want to do. I just want greatness for myself. My time is now, so that’s what I have to be on.

My father’s my biggest influence, man. He just keeps me going and motivated. He’s always keeping that pressure on me and tells me to not stop. He reminds me that this isn’t the end but the beginning. I’m glad to have him around.” D’Montae, pictured with Trey in Shawnee

 “It’s alright, sometimes, to live in the moment. Go as you are. Right now, people are always on social media and watching how other people live their lives and will rush to be like the next person. The best thing is to be on your own time. That’s the way to live, no matter what. You can have all of the money but if you can’t enjoy it and be on your own time, it ain’t even worth it. - Brandon, Chickasaw

“It’s alright, sometimes, to live in the moment. Go as you are. Right now, people are always on social media and watching how other people live their lives and will rush to be like the next person. The best thing is to be on your own time. That’s the way to live, no matter what. You can have all of the money but if you can’t enjoy it and be on your own time, it ain’t even worth it. - Brandon, Chickasaw

 “I was only nine years old when my mother died. We were living over there by Shawnee Terrace and my mother was always down here, hanging out with her friends. She had friends all through here. One night, she was walking through the alley, over there off of 15th and Madison. She got in the car with a man, who didn’t like the fact that she was cool with someone that he didn’t like, and I guess she said something wrong to him and he started shooting at her. He shot her once in the chest and twice in the head. My granny didn’t even recognize her when she went to see her body. For real, jealousy is the reason why my mother is gone.  People really don’t understand that in God’s eyes, everyone is really brothers and sisters. People are really out here killing their own brother and sister. The whole world is just messed up to me. It needs to change. You can’t even walk outside without somebody shooting.   There’s too many snakes in the grass. People have to watch out because everyone’s loyalty ain’t deep. A few months ago, my thirteen year old nephew got shot. The bullet is close to his heart. He felt like he could just run around people that he grew up with. They switched lanes and shot him. Sometimes, it’s the same people that you eat and share bread with that are fakest. My loyalty’s deep.  Right now, I just have to focus on things that make me happy. I don’t want to keep thinking about the past. I need to focus on something that’s going to keep me going forward instead of something holding me back in the past.  I struggle every day because there’s always something that’s keeping me from getting to where I need to be. It just makes me feel like I need a mother. I don’t need a person to tell me what to do. I don’t need a guardian. My daddy’s not in my life. I just want my mother.  My advice to world? Don’t disrespect your mother. People argue with their mother and the next day, not thinking that the next day, she could be gone. It hurts me to see people disrespect their mother. At the end of the day, you have to stick with your mother through it all, no matter what. Whatever drama she goes through, you have to go through it with her. That’s where your loyalty should run deep.” - Brianna, Russell

“I was only nine years old when my mother died. We were living over there by Shawnee Terrace and my mother was always down here, hanging out with her friends. She had friends all through here. One night, she was walking through the alley, over there off of 15th and Madison. She got in the car with a man, who didn’t like the fact that she was cool with someone that he didn’t like, and I guess she said something wrong to him and he started shooting at her. He shot her once in the chest and twice in the head. My granny didn’t even recognize her when she went to see her body. For real, jealousy is the reason why my mother is gone.

People really don’t understand that in God’s eyes, everyone is really brothers and sisters. People are really out here killing their own brother and sister. The whole world is just messed up to me. It needs to change. You can’t even walk outside without somebody shooting. 

There’s too many snakes in the grass. People have to watch out because everyone’s loyalty ain’t deep. A few months ago, my thirteen year old nephew got shot. The bullet is close to his heart. He felt like he could just run around people that he grew up with. They switched lanes and shot him. Sometimes, it’s the same people that you eat and share bread with that are fakest. My loyalty’s deep.

Right now, I just have to focus on things that make me happy. I don’t want to keep thinking about the past. I need to focus on something that’s going to keep me going forward instead of something holding me back in the past.

I struggle every day because there’s always something that’s keeping me from getting to where I need to be. It just makes me feel like I need a mother. I don’t need a person to tell me what to do. I don’t need a guardian. My daddy’s not in my life. I just want my mother.

My advice to world? Don’t disrespect your mother. People argue with their mother and the next day, not thinking that the next day, she could be gone. It hurts me to see people disrespect their mother. At the end of the day, you have to stick with your mother through it all, no matter what. Whatever drama she goes through, you have to go through it with her. That’s where your loyalty should run deep.” - Brianna, Russell

 “I’ve been here my whole life, for fifty years. In a nutshell, this is my home. With that being said, it’s a beautiful place, down here. It gets a bad reputation due to some of the acts that go on down here. As a whole, the community is fabulous. We’re all friendly and we all get along, outside of the small percentage of the negative. We love on each other and stick together. It’s a great place and I’m happy with it. I love the hood. I love it down here.  I’d like to show some of these young cats positive influences. I wanna show young men that there are opportunities in the West End. Just because you are a resident of the West End, it doesn’t limit your opportunities. You can get out if you want but you can stay and help build opportunities for someone else. This community is strong and there’s a lot of money down here, that unfortunately, gets spent outside of the community. We lack a lot of things down here. When I was a young man, we had a lot of black owned businesses, like mom and pop stores. We had grocery and meat stores that were owned by black people. It has diminished.   For a long time, the mindset has been to get out of the West End but this is our roots. I’d rather create more roots and show these cats that you can be an entrepreneur. You don’t have to be a drug dealer or out here robbing people. There’s opportunities out here for us. You can create your own thing and don’t have to go no where else to do it. That’s why I do it. I wanna show them something.  The West End needs more black owned businesses. We need more programs to engage the youth and some things that they can relate to. Show them something tangible. It has to be something that a young person can acquire. A lot of youth don’t realize that it takes a little bit of work to be able to have something because they’re so used to things be given to them or being denied the access to resources. A lot of them just don’t know and if they don’t know, you can’t really hold them accountable for it. They only know what they see.   I gotta record but I was fortunate enough to be exposed to other things.  That taught me that the talents that I had, I could use to my advantage and use them right here. I was exposed to other things that helped me along my journey.  We need to pass down the positive things to the people. We’re experts at passing down the bullshit. We’ll rather pass the game to the young cats and lace them like shoes but lace them bullshit. We need to lace them with good shit. When I talk to these kids out here, I don’t talk to them about the streets. I talk to them about their future. I’m a high school dropout. By the time I hit ninth grade, drugs was so fluent in our community and I wanted to sell dope. I caught up in the madness and went to the penitentiary to learn my lesson. I’m not a penitentiary type of cat, I can’t be caged up. When they let me go, I got into sales and used that in the legal world. That’s where I’m at with it. If I don't have a job, I can make one.  My advice to the world is to recognize that we’re all the same. Regardless of the color of your skin, it’s all about the content of your heart. If we breed that into our youth, we would be able to love one another and create some unity. The youth is our future. If we keep with the examples that we’ve been given, it’ll be rough out here with the mindset of the people because there ain’t no love out here. We have to build it and do it in our youth. We have a couple of generations that missed the boat and were the start of the downfall. That’s speaking about my generation. My parents had good jobs but they fought for that. What’s sad is that our people is giving back, in less than a lifetime, everything that was fought for.   King was killed in 1968 and I was born in 1968. The generation before me fought for everything and within a lifetime, look what we digressed back to? We had problems with police killing people in our communities back then and we had people who fought that and minimized that and restored order within our communities. Here we are, today, less than a lifetime later, we’re giving it all back.” - Jason, owner of Flo’s in Shawnee

“I’ve been here my whole life, for fifty years. In a nutshell, this is my home. With that being said, it’s a beautiful place, down here. It gets a bad reputation due to some of the acts that go on down here. As a whole, the community is fabulous. We’re all friendly and we all get along, outside of the small percentage of the negative. We love on each other and stick together. It’s a great place and I’m happy with it. I love the hood. I love it down here.

I’d like to show some of these young cats positive influences. I wanna show young men that there are opportunities in the West End. Just because you are a resident of the West End, it doesn’t limit your opportunities. You can get out if you want but you can stay and help build opportunities for someone else. This community is strong and there’s a lot of money down here, that unfortunately, gets spent outside of the community. We lack a lot of things down here. When I was a young man, we had a lot of black owned businesses, like mom and pop stores. We had grocery and meat stores that were owned by black people. It has diminished. 

For a long time, the mindset has been to get out of the West End but this is our roots. I’d rather create more roots and show these cats that you can be an entrepreneur. You don’t have to be a drug dealer or out here robbing people. There’s opportunities out here for us. You can create your own thing and don’t have to go no where else to do it. That’s why I do it. I wanna show them something.

The West End needs more black owned businesses. We need more programs to engage the youth and some things that they can relate to. Show them something tangible. It has to be something that a young person can acquire. A lot of youth don’t realize that it takes a little bit of work to be able to have something because they’re so used to things be given to them or being denied the access to resources. A lot of them just don’t know and if they don’t know, you can’t really hold them accountable for it. They only know what they see. 

I gotta record but I was fortunate enough to be exposed to other things.  That taught me that the talents that I had, I could use to my advantage and use them right here. I was exposed to other things that helped me along my journey.

We need to pass down the positive things to the people. We’re experts at passing down the bullshit. We’ll rather pass the game to the young cats and lace them like shoes but lace them bullshit. We need to lace them with good shit. When I talk to these kids out here, I don’t talk to them about the streets. I talk to them about their future. I’m a high school dropout. By the time I hit ninth grade, drugs was so fluent in our community and I wanted to sell dope. I caught up in the madness and went to the penitentiary to learn my lesson. I’m not a penitentiary type of cat, I can’t be caged up. When they let me go, I got into sales and used that in the legal world. That’s where I’m at with it. If I don't have a job, I can make one.

My advice to the world is to recognize that we’re all the same. Regardless of the color of your skin, it’s all about the content of your heart. If we breed that into our youth, we would be able to love one another and create some unity. The youth is our future. If we keep with the examples that we’ve been given, it’ll be rough out here with the mindset of the people because there ain’t no love out here. We have to build it and do it in our youth. We have a couple of generations that missed the boat and were the start of the downfall. That’s speaking about my generation. My parents had good jobs but they fought for that. What’s sad is that our people is giving back, in less than a lifetime, everything that was fought for. 

King was killed in 1968 and I was born in 1968. The generation before me fought for everything and within a lifetime, look what we digressed back to? We had problems with police killing people in our communities back then and we had people who fought that and minimized that and restored order within our communities. Here we are, today, less than a lifetime later, we’re giving it all back.” - Jason, owner of Flo’s in Shawnee

 "Where did my interest in chess stem from? I’d say have to say my daughter, Sarah. She’s my first child and only child. I introduced her to chess when she was six. She started participating in tournaments at the age of seven. I wanted to introduce her to chess because there’s a lot of studies that show if a student gets involved and stays in chess, it’ll help improve their reading skills and math skills. That’s one thing that I really wanted for her. Reading wasn’t an issue, because she’s a bibliophile, like her dad and mom.  I remember when she walked in the library in Boone County and looked at me and said, ‘Daddy, I’m in heaven.”. The math was an issue. We weren’t strong in math. My friend told me to get her in chess and it’ll help her with the math and it did.   I saw what it did for Sarah and I wanted to introduce chess to other kids and that was it. In September 2010, I went into it, with the encouragement of Dr. Anthony Middleton, from Cable Baptist Church and I haven’t looked back since.   Our vision is to become the most successful urban chess program in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. In order to accomplish that, we need the financial material resources. We have to get the students to tournaments, bring in other trainers, and keep solid training materials. Our biggest challenge, right now, is raising money to get to the nationals. Secondly, I would like like raise money to be able compensate our coaches for their time. Thirdly, it doesn’t hurt to have more clocks. We could use more clocks.  We’re looking to be the best and we’re going to maintain program. When I’m dead and buried, I want this program to continue to be the best.” - Corbin, Director of the West Louisville Chess Club in Russell

"Where did my interest in chess stem from? I’d say have to say my daughter, Sarah. She’s my first child and only child. I introduced her to chess when she was six. She started participating in tournaments at the age of seven. I wanted to introduce her to chess because there’s a lot of studies that show if a student gets involved and stays in chess, it’ll help improve their reading skills and math skills. That’s one thing that I really wanted for her. Reading wasn’t an issue, because she’s a bibliophile, like her dad and mom.

I remember when she walked in the library in Boone County and looked at me and said, ‘Daddy, I’m in heaven.”. The math was an issue. We weren’t strong in math. My friend told me to get her in chess and it’ll help her with the math and it did. 

I saw what it did for Sarah and I wanted to introduce chess to other kids and that was it. In September 2010, I went into it, with the encouragement of Dr. Anthony Middleton, from Cable Baptist Church and I haven’t looked back since. 

Our vision is to become the most successful urban chess program in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. In order to accomplish that, we need the financial material resources. We have to get the students to tournaments, bring in other trainers, and keep solid training materials. Our biggest challenge, right now, is raising money to get to the nationals. Secondly, I would like like raise money to be able compensate our coaches for their time. Thirdly, it doesn’t hurt to have more clocks. We could use more clocks.

We’re looking to be the best and we’re going to maintain program. When I’m dead and buried, I want this program to continue to be the best.” - Corbin, Director of the West Louisville Chess Club in Russell

 “I’ve been in Park Hill for almost twenty-six years. It’ll be twenty-six years in October. So, I’ve been here for a while. I’m kind of ill, so I just hang out around here. I love going to church but I haven’t been able to attend lately. Now, I just listen to it on my radio but when I start feeling better, I’ll make it back in there. I have arthritis in my legs and it’s been going on for some years. It keeps me from doing a lot of moving.   With all of this going on, I’ve started to enjoy reading. I’ve learned how to read better. It makes me really want to go back to school. It’s never too late, you know. Things were just going on, in my life, that kept me from going back to school. I feel like I can really do it and see myself reach my goals.” - Carolyn, Park Hill

“I’ve been in Park Hill for almost twenty-six years. It’ll be twenty-six years in October. So, I’ve been here for a while. I’m kind of ill, so I just hang out around here. I love going to church but I haven’t been able to attend lately. Now, I just listen to it on my radio but when I start feeling better, I’ll make it back in there. I have arthritis in my legs and it’s been going on for some years. It keeps me from doing a lot of moving. 

With all of this going on, I’ve started to enjoy reading. I’ve learned how to read better. It makes me really want to go back to school. It’s never too late, you know. Things were just going on, in my life, that kept me from going back to school. I feel like I can really do it and see myself reach my goals.” - Carolyn, Park Hill

 “I like the West End. It just makes me feel like I’m home. I haven’t had a negative experience. Nobody’s every robbed me or anything like that. It’s been good. I even love that my daughter can grow up and be around people that look like her.   One of my favorite places in the West is the Urban League. I love that place. It has been an amazing place for me and my daughter. Everything you need, no matter what, you can get it there. We need more places like the Urban League. We need more places that really take care of the people within the community. If we had more places that focus on the youth, the homeless, and mental health, we would have a better community.   My goal is to have a place and program that’ll help get the youth off the streets. I’m trying to figure out how to do that and then I’ll execute. I want to have a place where the homeless youth can come to and focus on something positive and have another outlet.   I want people to be more positive and do everything with love. Know that there are good people out here and not everybody’s negative. Smile more and show more love.” - Nisha (pictured with daughter, Mykah), Russell

“I like the West End. It just makes me feel like I’m home. I haven’t had a negative experience. Nobody’s every robbed me or anything like that. It’s been good. I even love that my daughter can grow up and be around people that look like her. 

One of my favorite places in the West is the Urban League. I love that place. It has been an amazing place for me and my daughter. Everything you need, no matter what, you can get it there. We need more places like the Urban League. We need more places that really take care of the people within the community. If we had more places that focus on the youth, the homeless, and mental health, we would have a better community. 

My goal is to have a place and program that’ll help get the youth off the streets. I’m trying to figure out how to do that and then I’ll execute. I want to have a place where the homeless youth can come to and focus on something positive and have another outlet. 

I want people to be more positive and do everything with love. Know that there are good people out here and not everybody’s negative. Smile more and show more love.” - Nisha (pictured with daughter, Mykah), Russell

 “I’m the director of the West Louisville Tennis Club. When we first had our opening day, we had about seventy parents and kids out here. Every Thursday at six o’clock, we have free tennis lessons. We’re a non profit organization that plays tennis here and have been here for decades. We travel to different cities to play other clubs, too.  As of today, there are only two blacks who were inducted into the Kentucky Tennis Hall of Fame and that’s Arthur Lloyd Johnson and my friend Bruce Stone. That’s part of the legacy of the West Louisville Tennis Club.   I’m a certified tennis coach and I work for the United States Tennis Association. That’s the same organization that pays Venus and Serena Williams. We have a chapter here called the USTA of Kentucky. I’ve been in different schools, targeting the areas that’s not exposed to tennis. So, we’ve been to all of the West End schools trying to expose African American youth to tennis.   This is the home court for St. Francis and Central High School. It’s been a decade since Central’s had a tennis team, so it’s been pretty good for the community. Hopefully, we can continue this venture with the community, exposing kids to another sport. Not only that, we’re just trying to help raise kids in the community.  My brother, Frank, introduced me to tennis. He really got excited with Arthur Ashe won the Wimbledon in 1975. He went out and bought a couple of rackets and I didn’t have a choice but to come out and play with him. He taught me how to play. That was in the mid-seventies and I’ve been playing ever since. As the years went by, I realized that it’s one of those sports that you can play in your seventies and eighties. I had a cousin that played until he was 83 years old. It’s one of those sports that gets under your skin and you can’t help it. You can’t play basketball and football forever.  We do a lot of fellowshipping and having fun out here. Plus, you get to stay in some type of shape. It’s a lot of fun. We have tournaments where people will come in from all over and get points. If they earn so many points, they can go to New York.   I’ve been kind of disappointed and hurt by West Louisville’s crime situation. I started an organization called 'Prevention 2000’ which is about keeping kids safe. My wife, my daughter and I would go teach kids about stranger danger but I’m really concerned with the number of deaths that we had.   I’m concerned about the lack of affordable housing and jobs. If people can’t work, they can’t live. There’s no affordable housing here. The ones that are available, are getting bought by investors that don’t live here nor care about the community. If you can’t work and have a safe place to live, what kind of quality of life do you have? It seems like no one wants to get really involved in matters, such as this, until it affects them and that’s too late. We need to be more proactive with those things and the community will be much better, as a whole.” - Mr. Donnie, Chickasaw

“I’m the director of the West Louisville Tennis Club. When we first had our opening day, we had about seventy parents and kids out here. Every Thursday at six o’clock, we have free tennis lessons. We’re a non profit organization that plays tennis here and have been here for decades. We travel to different cities to play other clubs, too.

As of today, there are only two blacks who were inducted into the Kentucky Tennis Hall of Fame and that’s Arthur Lloyd Johnson and my friend Bruce Stone. That’s part of the legacy of the West Louisville Tennis Club. 

I’m a certified tennis coach and I work for the United States Tennis Association. That’s the same organization that pays Venus and Serena Williams. We have a chapter here called the USTA of Kentucky. I’ve been in different schools, targeting the areas that’s not exposed to tennis. So, we’ve been to all of the West End schools trying to expose African American youth to tennis. 

This is the home court for St. Francis and Central High School. It’s been a decade since Central’s had a tennis team, so it’s been pretty good for the community. Hopefully, we can continue this venture with the community, exposing kids to another sport. Not only that, we’re just trying to help raise kids in the community.

My brother, Frank, introduced me to tennis. He really got excited with Arthur Ashe won the Wimbledon in 1975. He went out and bought a couple of rackets and I didn’t have a choice but to come out and play with him. He taught me how to play. That was in the mid-seventies and I’ve been playing ever since. As the years went by, I realized that it’s one of those sports that you can play in your seventies and eighties. I had a cousin that played until he was 83 years old. It’s one of those sports that gets under your skin and you can’t help it. You can’t play basketball and football forever.

We do a lot of fellowshipping and having fun out here. Plus, you get to stay in some type of shape. It’s a lot of fun. We have tournaments where people will come in from all over and get points. If they earn so many points, they can go to New York. 

I’ve been kind of disappointed and hurt by West Louisville’s crime situation. I started an organization called 'Prevention 2000’ which is about keeping kids safe. My wife, my daughter and I would go teach kids about stranger danger but I’m really concerned with the number of deaths that we had. 

I’m concerned about the lack of affordable housing and jobs. If people can’t work, they can’t live. There’s no affordable housing here. The ones that are available, are getting bought by investors that don’t live here nor care about the community. If you can’t work and have a safe place to live, what kind of quality of life do you have? It seems like no one wants to get really involved in matters, such as this, until it affects them and that’s too late. We need to be more proactive with those things and the community will be much better, as a whole.” - Mr. Donnie, Chickasaw

 "Life goes on and you can’t let it stop you. You can’t sit in your misery because you won’t get ahead. You gotta keep pushing and move forward. Everyday’s a blessing. You gotta love your life.” - Justus, Russell

"Life goes on and you can’t let it stop you. You can’t sit in your misery because you won’t get ahead. You gotta keep pushing and move forward. Everyday’s a blessing. You gotta love your life.” - Justus, Russell

 “When it comes to performing at Forecastle, I’m speechless. Last year, I performed with 1200, as one of his backup singers. Now, I’m honored to have a chance to hop on the stage, grab a mic and show people what I have to offer.  I’ve been performing since the age of nine and been writing since eleven. Personally, I have a lot of growing to do, musically. I think that if I mix my personal life with my music, it’ll show that I’m keeping it real with people. I can put my life experiences inside the booth, write about it and record it. It’s my outlet. I put my all into this music thing. By the grace of God, I’ve been able to perform, write, and sing music.  I've always had this mindset to where I wanted to be the best. To be the best, you’ve got to believe the you’re the best and I believe that I am. I just want to push myself to be better. I’m too competitive. I have to continue to work hard. My parents told me that if I find myself sitting on the couch, somebody else will be working harder than me. I don’t want that. That’s why I push myself mentally and physically to get in the studio, whether that’s pushing a button or writing a rhyme.   In the West we need love, more voices, and we need to come to together. There’s too much hate going on in the city. We need more people out here, to start a movement and not down talk the youth. It’s time to better the city. We need to show the youth that they can pick up a mic, a pen, or a camera. Put the guns down. You can pick up anything and use to better your community. We need to come together and it all starts with you. It starts with that one person that’s willing to speak out and come together to show people that we can come together. It’s all about love, more voices, and coming together.” - Metez, Shawnee  Catch his performance during the West Louisville Showcase, this Saturday, at Forecastle!

“When it comes to performing at Forecastle, I’m speechless. Last year, I performed with 1200, as one of his backup singers. Now, I’m honored to have a chance to hop on the stage, grab a mic and show people what I have to offer.

I’ve been performing since the age of nine and been writing since eleven. Personally, I have a lot of growing to do, musically. I think that if I mix my personal life with my music, it’ll show that I’m keeping it real with people. I can put my life experiences inside the booth, write about it and record it. It’s my outlet. I put my all into this music thing. By the grace of God, I’ve been able to perform, write, and sing music.

I've always had this mindset to where I wanted to be the best. To be the best, you’ve got to believe the you’re the best and I believe that I am. I just want to push myself to be better. I’m too competitive. I have to continue to work hard. My parents told me that if I find myself sitting on the couch, somebody else will be working harder than me. I don’t want that. That’s why I push myself mentally and physically to get in the studio, whether that’s pushing a button or writing a rhyme. 

In the West we need love, more voices, and we need to come to together. There’s too much hate going on in the city. We need more people out here, to start a movement and not down talk the youth. It’s time to better the city. We need to show the youth that they can pick up a mic, a pen, or a camera. Put the guns down. You can pick up anything and use to better your community. We need to come together and it all starts with you. It starts with that one person that’s willing to speak out and come together to show people that we can come together. It’s all about love, more voices, and coming together.” - Metez, Shawnee

Catch his performance during the West Louisville Showcase, this Saturday, at Forecastle!

 “After all of the performances that Amped allowed us to do, we don’t think that we’ll be nervous at Forecastle. When we get up there, it’s going to be like woah! It’ll be a big crowd but it will be fun.  We’ve had a lot of experiences and opportunities with Amped. We feel ready. Amped helped us be more confident and not be so nervous. We want to let our words be known to the public. We want to tell our stories that are really valuable to our community. It’s about getting a different message out. Now, there’s rappers that are always rapping about girls and other things. It’s not a lot of spotlight on Christian rappers.  We want to encourage and help people with our songs and make it so that they can relate to it.” - X, Chickasaw  Catch their performance during the West Louisville Showcase, this Saturday, at Forecastle! #FORECASTLEWEST

“After all of the performances that Amped allowed us to do, we don’t think that we’ll be nervous at Forecastle. When we get up there, it’s going to be like woah! It’ll be a big crowd but it will be fun.

We’ve had a lot of experiences and opportunities with Amped. We feel ready. Amped helped us be more confident and not be so nervous. We want to let our words be known to the public. We want to tell our stories that are really valuable to our community. It’s about getting a different message out. Now, there’s rappers that are always rapping about girls and other things. It’s not a lot of spotlight on Christian rappers.

We want to encourage and help people with our songs and make it so that they can relate to it.” - X, Chickasaw

Catch their performance during the West Louisville Showcase, this Saturday, at Forecastle! #FORECASTLEWEST